Sunday, February 25, 2007

Patrice Luzi

Patrice Luzi Bernardi is a French goalkeeper just with Liverpool but released by the Anfield club in June 2005. He then signed a contract with Belgian side Mouscron.
Having formerly played for Monaco and Ajaccio, Luzi made his Liverpool debut in January 2004 against Chelsea in a 1-0 win. He made two wonderful saves to deny Chelsea, but was left frustrated when he later was left out from the first team. His chances where limited when Liverpool loaned in Southampton's Paul Jones to cover from Jerzy Dudek and Chris Kirkland. Patrice Luzi has been described as a good shot stopper with good handling and distribution.
The SRBs are the biggest solid-propellant motors ever flown and the first of such large rockets designed for reuse. Each is 149.16 feet long and 12.17 feet in diameter.

Tuesday, February 20, 2007

Mysore Palace

A silhouette of the Mysore Palace illuminated with ninety seven thousand bulbs shining against an inky black night is one of the most enduring images of the city.
A priceless national wealth and the pride of a kingdom, the Mysore Palace is the seat of the famed Wodeyar Maharajas of Mysore.
An free synthesis of architectural styles the palace is one of India’s most dramatic national monuments. Today it is a museum housing treasures from across the world reflecting the rich and colorful history of the previous significant state of Mysore.
The Mysore Palace is open all days of the week, from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. The palace is not opened on Sundays, national holidays and state festivals from 7:00 p.m. to 8 p.m. The palace is illuminated between 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. only for the period of the Dasare festival.
If you would like to treat yourself to a private guided tour of the entire palace complex, Mysore Palace Board specialized tour guides can be found at the entrance to the palace. The guides will guide you to the things to see of the Mysore Palace at a nominal fee.

Wednesday, February 14, 2007

Ice cream

Before the growth of modern refrigeration, ice cream was a luxury item kept for special occasions. Making ice cream was quite difficult. Ice was cut commercially from lakes and ponds during the winter and stored in large heaps in holes in the ground or in wood-frame ice houses, insulated by straw. Ice cream was made by hand in a huge bowl enclosed by packed ice and salt. The temperature of the ingredients was reduced by the mix of compressed ice and salt. The salt water was chilled by the ice, and the action of the salt on the ice causes it to (partially) melt, absorbing latent heat bringing the combination below the freezing point of pure water. The wrapped up container can also make better thermal contact with the salty water and ice mixture than it could with ice alone.The hand-cranked churn, which still used ice and salt for cooling, was made-up by an American named Nancy Johnson in 1846, making invention possible on site and avoiding the problem of nonstop chilling between production and consumer. Ice cream became a trendy item for the first time. The world's first business ice cream factory was opened in Baltimore, Maryland in 1851, by Jacob Fussell, a dairy farmer. An unstable demand for his milk led him to mass create ice cream. This allowed the previously expensive invention to be offered in the city at reduced prices.Fussell opened ice cream parlors as far west as Texas. Many were still around well into the twentieth century. Fussell later sold his business to Borden.
The improvement of industrial refrigeration by German engineer Carl von Linde during the 1870s eliminated the need to cut and store natural ice and when the continuous-process freezer was perfected in 1926, allowed commercial mass invention of ice cream and the birth of the modern ice cream industry.The most common method for producing ice cream at home is to use an ice cream maker, in modern times normally an electrical device that churns the ice cream mixture while cooled inside a house freezer, or using ice and salt. A newer method of making home-made ice cream is to add liquid nitrogen to the mixture while moving it using a spoon or spatula.

Tuesday, February 06, 2007


Gold is a extremely sought-after valuable metal that for many centuries has been used as money, a store of value and in ornaments. The metal occurs as nugget or grains in rocks and in alluvial deposits and is one of the coinage metals. It is a soft, glossy, yellow, dense, malleable, and ductile (trivalent and univalent) change metal. Modern manufacturing uses include dentistry and electronics. Gold forms the basis for a financial typical used by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the Bank for International resolution (BIS). Its ISO currency code is XAU.
Gold is a tinny element with a trait yellow color, but can also be black or ruby when finely alienated, while colloidal solutions are intensely tinted and often purple. These colors are the effect of gold's plasmon frequency lying in the visible range, which causes red and yellow glow to be reflected, and blue light to be engrossed. Only silver colloids show the same interactions with light, albeit at a shorter occurrence, making silver colloids yellow in color.
Gold is a good conductor of temperature and electricity, and is not precious by air and most reagents. Heat, damp, oxygen, and most corrosive agents have very little chemical effect on gold, making it well-suited for use in coins and jewelry; equally, halogens will chemically alter gold, and aqua regia dissolve it.
Pure gold is too soft for ordinary use and is hard-boiled by alloying with silver, copper, and other metals. Gold and its lots of alloys are most often used in jewelry, coinage and as a typical for monetary exchange in various countries. When promotion it in the form of jewelry, gold is calculated in karats (k), with pure gold being 24k. However, it is more commonly sold in lower capacity of 22k, 18k, and 14k. A lower "k" indicates a higher percent of copper or silver assorted into the alloy, with copper being the more typically used metal between the two. Fourteen karat gold-copper alloy will be almost identical in color to definite bronze alloys, and both may be used to produce polish and added badges. Eighteen karat gold with a high copper content is establish in some traditional jewelry and will have a distinct, though not dominant copper cast, giving an attractively warm color. A comparable karat weight when alloyed with silvery metals will appear less humid in color, and some low karat white metal alloys may be sold as "white gold", silvery in exterior with a slightly yellow cast but far more resistant to decay than silver or sterling silver. Karat weights of twenty and higher is more general in modern jewelry. Because of its high electrical conductivity and confrontation to decay and other desirable combinations of physical and chemical properties, gold also emerged in the late 20th century as an vital industrial metal, particularly as thin plating on electrical card associates and connectors.